Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside

For this week’s challenge I posted pictures of the USS Growler Submarine, now a museum on Pier 42 in New York City. It floats right beside the very impressive aircraft carrier Intrepid Sea & Air Museum. The Growler is the only American diesel-powered nuclear sub open to the public. It patrolled the Pacific coast of the Soviet Union from 1958 to 1964 during the tenuous times of the cold war. 95 men lived and worked on the sub for up to three months at a time in very cramped quarters. I commend submariners for their years of service inside these giant “tin cans” and I truly think these are the bravest men in the military period!

The USS Growler dwarfed by the massive cruise ship, a great comparison between old and new technology between these sea faring vessels.

This is the entrance to the Growler. I visited with my daughter and brother.

My daughter could barely squeeze through here, let alone a grown man!

With such tight quarters and so many men, you have to utilize every nook and cranny on board (as you can see by the beds).

Missle Checkout and Guidance Center.

Officers ate their meals, conducted meetings and socialized in this wardroom.

More sleeping quarters

The CO (Commanding Officer) had the Growler’s private stateroom which also served as his office. The bed could fold against the wall revealing two additional vinyl-covered seats.

I didn’t note what this room was used for. If any submariners out there know, by all means, educate me and chime in!

Enlisted men ate in the crew’s mess, or dining room. As the only common space aboard the Growler the mess was also used for meetings and relaxation. After dinner the crew enjoyed films such as the “The Outlaw” (1943), a western that was re-released in the late 1940s and witnessed international popularity in the 50s and 60s thanks to its well-proportioned star, Jane Russell. According to one account, the crew literally wore out the film by playing and replaying the Jane Russell scenes. Crew members also played games such as checkers, backgammon, cribbage and poker.

I think this is part of the ship’s galley where meals were cooked.

Bunk beds for the crew. Talk about being packed in like sardines!

Notice the tiny shower stall in the rear. Some men worked on the Growler for weeks even months without showering. Yikes!

The Engine Room.

More of the engine room.

This is the maneuvering room. Here, crew members controlled the Growler’s speed as ordered by officers in the control room. The Growler’s maximum speed was 12 knots (14 mph/22 kph) and 20 knots (23 mph/37 kph)surfaced.

The torpedo room (there are aft and forward tubes on the Growler). Notice the beds even in this room!

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7 responses to “Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside

  1. Pingback: Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside | Wind Against Current·

  2. Wow, thank you so much for the tour. Very interesting. Very brave and amazing men who served in those conditions.

  3. very cool photos – since my son joined the Navy i love insights like these. When i went on board once i was astounded at how closely they have to live

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